All 38 List of Shakespeare's Plays

Hello Topifyer, here we list all the plays written by William Shakespeare. No doubt, Shakespeare, in terms of both his life and body of work, is the most written-about author in the history of Western civilization. His canon includes 38 plays, 154 sonnets and two epic narrative poems. During his lifetime, many of his plays were published in what are known as Quarto editions, frequently without receiving the playwright’s permission. To this extent, we are prompted to list Shakespeare's 38 plays just for you.

Shakespeare Plays

The ideal way to become acquainted with Shakespeare is to see his plays, not merely to read them or read about them. The plays were written by a practical man of the theater who wrote them to be seen — not read by a loud, boisterous audience accustomed to shouting its approval or hissing its displeasure. The sounds of the language were very important to communicating and playwrights were known as poets (bards) in their day. A play had to be exciting, moving, and violent, filled with fury, humor, and truth, in order to keep such an audience interested. Shakespeare’s characters felt emotions — love, jealousy, ambition, joy, and grief — that are as universal today as they were 400 years ago.

The character forms the center of the interest in Shakespeare’s plays. Note exactly how each is introduced and how well defined the personality becomes immediately. Shakespeare used the soliloquy and accurate descriptions by other actors to delineate his characters, for there were no programs to provide any explanations.

However, no man’s life has been the subject of more speculation than William Shakespeare’s. For all his fame and celebration, Shakespeare’s personal history remains a mystery. There are two primary sources for information on the Bard—his works, and various legal and church documents that have survived from Elizabethan times. Unfortunately, there are many gaps in this information and much room for conjecture.

List of All Shakespeare's Plays A-Z

  • All’s Well that Ends Well
  • Antony and Cleopatra
  • As You Like It
  • Comedy of Errors
  • Corialanus
  • Cymbeline
  • Hamlet
  • Henry IV, Parts I and II
  • Henry V
  • Henry VI, Parts I, II and III
  • Henry VIII
  • Julius Caesar
  • King John
  • King Lear
  • Love’s Labour’s Lost
  • Macbeth
  • Measure for Measure
  • Merchant of Venice
  • Merry Wives of Windsor
  • A Midsummer’s Night Dream
  • Much Ado About Nothing
  • Othello
  • Pericles
  • Richard II
  • Richard III
  • Romeo and Juliet
  • The Taming of the Shrew
  • The Tempest
  • Timon of Athens
  • Titus Andronicus
  • Troilus and Cressida
  • Twelfth Night
  • Two Noble Kinsmen
  • Two Gentlemen of Verona
  • Winter’s Tale
  • William Shakespeare was said to be baptized at Stratford-upon-Avon on April 26, 1564, and was buried at Holy Trinity Church in Stratford on April 25, 1616. Tradition holds that he was born three days earlier, and that he died on his birthday—April 23—but this is perhaps more romantic myth than fact. Young William was born of John Shakespeare, a glover and leather merchant, and Mary Arden, a landed heiress. William, according to the church register, was the third of eight children in the Shakespeare household, three of whom died in childhood. We assume that Shakespeare went to grammar school, since his father was first a member of the Stratford Council and later high bailiff (the equivalent of town mayor). A grammar school education would have meant that Shakespeare was exposed to the rudiments of Latin rhetoric, logic and literature.

    Share and Broadcast Article

    Disqus Comments